Removing the “vs.” from Genre vs. Literary

Exploring the internet yesterday, I ended up on the Electric Lit website, reading Andy Hunter’s post, “Ursula K. Le Guin talks to Michael Cunningham about genres, gender, and broadening fiction.”  Anything with Michael Cunningham’s name in the title will get my attention, and though I haven’t read enough Ursula Le Guin, I did enjoy The Left Hand of Darkness, and reading this article got me interested in reading more.

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Michael Cunningham (The HoursThe Snow Queen) says of our current literary period, “I feel like the most prominent aspect of this period is what I call ‘broadening.'”  He goes on to explain that “broadening,” for him, means “the sense of a much larger collective conviction about who’s entitled to tell stories, what stories are worth telling, and who among the storytellers gets taken seriously.”   The post, Cunningham, and Le Guin discuss the line between “literary fiction” (Cunningham, Toni Morrison, J.M. Coetzee…) and “genre fiction” (science fiction, fantasy, mystery, thriller, horror,…) and the effects of that line.

I think this is an interesting and important discussion.  I’m aware as I write this post, that even putting the parentheses above and including genre labels and authors plays into defining and supporting the line between literary and genre fiction.  I agree with Cunningham and Le Guin that this line is not always meaningful and can be harmful.  Cunningham asserts that ” some of the most innovative, deep, and beautiful fiction being written today is shelved in bookstores in the Science Fiction section.”  Many people, as this post points out, declare an aversion to science fiction and other forms of genre fiction, perhaps picturing people dressed up as Star Trek characters and imagining that aliens, ghosts, and romances offer little more than superficial fantasies.  However, literature in any genre can offer meaningful experiences to the reader, and there is a lot of variation within all of these genres.  (There’s also a lot that can be learned from studying Star Trek and the community that has evolved around it–work that I have not done, but I’m certain others have!)  Calling one part of fiction “literary” or “mainstream” tends to put other types of fiction to one side as less serious or important.  Le Guin calls this “the lingering problem: The maintenance of an arbitrary division between ‘literature’ and ‘genre,’ the refusal to admit that every piece of fiction belongs to a genre, or several genres.”

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This comment of Le Guin’s reminded me of Cunningham’s Specimen Days, which weaves together excerpts of Walt Whitman’s poetry with stories from different time periods, including a story set a future landscape with nonhuman characters.  While Cunningham is considered to be a solidly “literary” author, his work does cross these “arbitrary line[s]” and benefits from doing so.

I think Stephen King and Juliet Marillier are other authors who are often placed in genres (horror, fantasy), but whose work is character-driven and aware of the power of language.  Both of these authors explore, as Le Guin and Cunningham do, the way humanity functions under different circumstances.

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Le Guin is right that “genre” is often “used not as a useful descriptor, but as a negative judgment, a dismissal.”  Later in the same post, Le Guin says “But the walls I hammered at so long are down.  They’re rubble.”  I hope that this is true.  I think this post does acknowledge that the division between genre and literary does still exist, but I agree that there are moments of wonderful crossover.  Categories can be useful as lenses for looking at literature, but works can and do fit into multiple categories sometimes.

This is a great conversation, and I hope you’ll check it out!–though I quoted from it here, the conversation is much more in-depth on the Electric Literature website.

What do you think?  Is there a line between “literary” and “genre fiction”?  Should there be a distinction?  Are there authors whom you feel have been placed in a genre category whose work could be looked at with a “literary” lens?  Which genres would you put some of your favorite “literary” authors in?

 

 

 

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And the Liebster goes to…

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Miss Literal over at literallyreading.wordpress.com nominated me for a Liebster Award!  Thanks, Miss Literal, for your thoughtfulness!  I enjoy your reviews, complete with cell phone images and related craft projects!  I hope people will check out Miss Literal’s fabulous blog!

 

So since the rules for this award are:

1. Thank the person who nominated you for the award.

2. Display the logo on your blog.

3. Answer the questions the award giver asked.

4. List 11 facts about yourself.

5. List your 11 nominees with 200 followers or less, no tagbacks.  (Sorry, I didn’t do 11!)

 

The questions I was asked:

1. Favorite comfort food?

My mother’s Swedish meatballs and rice.  No question.  She usually makes garlic bread with it, too.  Damn.  Now I’m hungry.

2. Favorite childhood movie?

Hmmm.  There were a few–a big one was The Last Unicorn.  As an adult, I have read the book, too, after a reminder I read from Patrick Rothfuss–great book, great movie–I still love it.  I also love Patrick Rothfuss’s KingKiller Chronicles and I’m eagerly awaiting the conclusion of the trilogy.  Eagerly.

3. Favorite current movie?

Oh no, I don’t know!  Hmm.  I love re-watching good period films–some good Austen will always get me!  Then there are others, too, like The Waitress, Ever After, and others that I love.  I’m a sucker for beautiful, colorful images on the screen, good lines, good soundtrack–beautiful food movies…

4. Favorite book?

Now I really can’t answer.  There are far too many.  I love Joyce Carol Oates, Michael Cunningham, Toni Morrison, Jodi Picoult, Stephen King, and so many more.  I also have some fantasy loves: Juliet Marillier and Tamora Pierce, in particular.

5. Favorite YouTuber?  I don’t have one!  I enjoy YouTube, though.  New question: What’s a location that means a lot to you?  (A coffee shop?  A favorite room?  A place in nature?  A place a world away?)

There are many, but one important one is my granndparents’ house.  The house is no longer there, but sometimes we go to that area and remember it.  It’s also by the ocean, so I like to go there and walk barefoot in the sand and look out at the familiar skyline.  Sometimes, I just go there in my mind.

6. Favorite actor/actress?

Hmm…right now I’m leaning toward Johnny Depp and Claire Danes.  My answer to this question will probably depend on what I’ve been watching.  I’m not good at favorites–just at loving things, liking them, feeling ambivalent, or really disliking them.

7. Favorite song?

Right now I’m listening to Jewel, Sarah McLachlan and Sheryl Crow…different songs by each.  It depends on my mood!

8. Website you cannot go one day without?

Email, Twitter, WordPress : )   …though I certainly hope I could go a day (or more…) without them…?

9. Clothing article or accessory you feel naked without?

A sweater.  I hate being cold.  I don’t like to allow for the possibility.  If I’m not wearing the sweater, it’s in my purse.

10. Pet peeve?

Hmmm…well, not too long ago I saw someone blow through an empty four-way stop honking his horn and giving the world the finger through the sunroof.  I was annoyed by that.  I was also disturbed.  Is he angry at the world?  Why?  Why express it this way?  I have some questions.

11. Number one reason you keep blogging?

I used to blog and then took a hiatus and now I’m back.  I like the community and reading people’s thoughts, and I think blogging is part of that; the reading and the writing pair nicely together.  I’m also focusing seriously on my other types of writing (short stories and upcoming novels), and I want to share my other writing work here.

 

My 11 Facts:

1. I like gardening.

2. Miss Literal – I get carpal tunnel too.  Knock on wood–haven’t had it in a bit!

3. I like cooking when I have time and energy.  I like trying new things.

4. I am terrified of the idea of scuba diving and will never do it.

5. I just started watching Tiny House Nation on the FYI channel with my husband.

6. My dog basically talks to me using sign language and noises.  I talk back.

7. I love elephants, and I have seen some in person, in their natural habitat.

8. I am wishing I had socks on right now because my feet are cold.

9. I love the early King’s Quest games (1-7, couldn’t get into 8).

10. Packing causes me a lot of anxiety.  What if I forget something??  What if it’s a sweater, and I’m cold???

11. I love listening to NPR, and yes, NPR, I did make a donation.  I love it all–Ted Talk Radio, Moth Radio Hour, All Things Considered, Science Fridays…

 

I now nominate the following diverse and excellent blogs (sorry if you already have 200 followers):

1. http://fieldnotesfromfatherhood.com/ – I enjoy the anecdotes about life and parenthood with humor, pictures, and video!

2. http://www.lisapais.com/blog-the-enchanted-notebookcom – Just started, but I know it’s going to be a good one!

3.  http://hauntedpen.blogspot.com – Great blog – very knowledgeable author and blogger.  Check her out on mostlymystery.com, too!

4. http://shortstoriesoftheordinary.wordpress.com/ – I enjoy the sudden turns in some of these stories, which could be humorous or sobering.

5. http://dreamingintoknowing.com/– Interesting thoughts on dreams, their uses, and meanings!

6. http://proudlybipolar.wordpress.com/ – I’m very drawn into these reflections on life, society, mental illness, and more.